EasyRiter writing gear.


With National Novel Writing Month fast approaching, some Comrades might be flirting with the idea of writing a novel longhand —  or, at least, parts.  We’re planning on featuring some equipment to make this easier on Comrades’ hands and spirits.

First up is some very interesting gear from Idea Sun in the UK.  John sent us an Easyriter pencil, sharpener and pen, gratis, for review.  First, the pencil.

Vitals:
Material: Extruded plastic, with wood pulp.
Shape: Triangular, concave/flat sides.
Finish: None.
Ferrule: None.
Eraser: None.
Core: Polymer/graphite composite. Available in #2/HB.
Markings: “EASYRITER…IDEASUN.COM”.
Origin: UK.
Availability: From IdeaSun.Com and brick and mortar retailers.


This is a very striking pencil.  As  you can see, it is very plain and very oddly-shaped.  What you cannot see is that it is also somewhat flexible.  This is due to the fact that the lead and barrel are both extruded plastic.  This marks a first for Pencil Revolution, where we usually seem stuck-up enough to only discuss wooden pencils (and usually only cedar at that).  But that doesn’t mean that there is no place for plastic.  The “wood” in the Easyriter is made of recycled wood, mixed with polymer.  At first glance, it looked like a large, weird golf pencil.  It’s nothing fancy to look at.

But that’s not the point of the Easyriter.  Rather, its shape mimics the grasp of a three-fingered pencil hold.  We’ve seen this general concept applied to different triangular pencils.  But the Easyriter takes it a step further.  The three sides are not equally-shaped.  One is flat (the part that meets your middle finger), while the other two are concave.  Because of this innovation, increased pressured merely squooshes your fingers into one other, not into the pencil.  This wide pencil is, honestly, incredibly comfortable for writing.  The woodpulp/polymer barrel provides a nice grip, and the pencil is also extremely lightweight.  And, while I’m not generally a fan of plastic pencils, this pencil would be ridiculously expensive to make out of wood, since each one would have to be shaped either by hand or by special machinery.  The wood pulp content does make you forget, and it’s got a nice texture.  The lead is surprisingly dark for a polymer pencil, and it’s nice and smooth.  I’d rate the darkness in general as pretty middle for an HB (Dixon-dark), and that says a lot with an extruded core.  I usually have to hammer those things to make a mark at all.  If you have to press too hard to make a mark, this pencil would defeat its own purpose.  But.  You don’t, and it doesn’t.  The lead is probably the best extruded cored pencil I’ve ever used.

I really like the included sharpener.  It’s a large-diameter sharpener, but with only one hole!  [Here it is next to one of my favorite sharpeners, a KUM brass wedge.]  John at IdeaSun tells us that it’s a stock item from India but they they are thinking of using their own specs in the future.  This is the only single-holed, large diameter sharpener I’ve ever used, and I hope that, if they do re-spec it, they keep this general design.

Technical Information (For Sharpener):
Type: Blade.
Material: Magnesium-alloy.
Shavings Receptacle: None.
Point Type: Medium (for wide-body pencils).
Markings: None.
Place of Manufacture: India.
Availability: From IdeaSun.Com.


Frankly, it’s a great sharpener, and I think the Dixon Tri-Conderoga would have been better with this than with the cheap-looking (though nicely-performing) plastic sharpener with which they come.  Sharpening is not as easy as with a round pencil, as is the case with most triangular pencils.  In fact, my first sharpening with the included sharpener was a little awkward because the angles of the factory sharpening were different that what this cool little sharpener was making.  After the first sharpening, however, it was smooth-going.  Triangular pencils produce really interesting shavings (see here for a great photo by Comrade Mark).  This pencil makes extremely cool-looking little shavings.  And, once you get the point in line with the included sharpener, they are long and smooth, just like sharpening a cedar pencil in a good wedge sharpener.  You certainly have to take care because of the severe angles.  But I am usually a careful sharpener anyway.

There’s also an Easyriter pen, if you just have to use dirty old ink (!). Actually, it’s got a nice weight and feel and is at least as comfortable as the pencil is to write with. My father was visiting my daughter and I for lunch (dill potato soup!) the day that the package came, and I think he was coveting the pen (he cannot use pencil at work).  It’s a black ballpoint pen with the same shape as the pencil.

If you’re thinking of doing some loooonnnngggg writing next month for National Novel Writing Month, you might seriously enjoy the Easyriter pencil (and pen).  If nothing else, it’s just a really cool, really comfortable pencil.  I can picture these in different colors, with capped ends being very attractive.  A ferrule might be nearly impossible (without being very expensive), but different colors (black!) with a dipped end and no factory sharpening, and this pencil could be quite beautiful.  As it stands now, it’s, again, COMFORTABLE, and that’s the point.

14 Responses to “EasyRiter writing gear.”

  1. JAbbott says:

    Looks interesting. I assumed it was an inexpensive pencil and was disappointed to see that a pack of 9 is $12 ($17 with S/H). That’s outside my price range for a roughly finished pencil. Capping the end is a good idea.

  2. Eric says:

    From the look of it; the pencil reminds me of what a Druaflame log might look like. If it is as comfortable as you say, then I could look past looks. I find the Tri-conderogas to be comfortable for long writing. If I were writing a novel by long hand I would go with a few boxes of Blackwings. As for sharpeners, can you really have too many? Ball point pens might be practical, but lack the fun of a good fountain pen.

  3. Kiwi-d says:

    Very interesting. Thanks for the post.

  4. Shane says:

    I have always rebelled at any triangular or other odd-shaped pencil that wants to force me to hold it in a certain way. And this pencil seems even more extreme in providing only *one* writing position. The lead will wear down quickly in that one spot. I guess the trade-off for all that comfort is the need to sharpen more frequently. (Which might be a plus if you have a sharpener you love to use?)

  5. John M. says:

    You mentioned writing a novel longhand. I once read that Clive Barker writes all his first drafts of novels long hand. It would be interesting to find out what is his writing instrument of choice.

  6. memm says:

    What an unusual pencil. Thanks for sharing this with us.

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  8. Eham says:

    Are these pencils available in different color leads.

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  10. Melissa says:

    Are either the pen or pencil still available? I can not find any reference to them on the internet at all, but I think they would be a great tool for my son who has dysgraphia.

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