All Hat No Cattle?

[Part two of the Mythbusting Double Header from the Watts follows below, continued from part one]

Another bonus! Two myths in one right here, baby: 1) The El Casco M-430 pencil sharpener produces the finest point available and 2) It is worth its exorbitant price.

04 Drawer and Handle

You’ve probably heard of the legendary El Casco M-430 sharpener. Our focus is on the “cheaply finished” version, the chrome and black which currently sells for $373 at Amazon, $450 at Barneys New York and $550 at Pen Boutique. David Rees, author of How to Sharpen Pencils, has described the M-430 as “. . . an extraordinary example of engineering . . . .” David has made a living as a humorously serious (or seriously humorous) expert on pencil sharpening and has stated this is not only the most expensive sharpener on the market, but also the best.

Brandon, a member of the Erasable Facebook community, obtained a gently used one in a fantastic deal of a lifetime and was delighted with his sharpener’s performance. Inspired, I haunted eBay until I was able to purchase a supposedly like new and unused El Casco M-430 for a fraction of the prices quoted above. If Hunter and I have gone this far with our reviews, I reasoned, why stop just short of the Holy Grail?

05 Front

Hunter and I agree with David Rees that the El Casco, which is a double-burr sharpener (the Carls and most other hand crank sharpeners are single burr) produces an exceptionally long point with a flattened tip (that happily reduces breakage upon first application of pressure) and that sports distinctly concave sides. I haven’t seen anything like what comes out of this sharpener, but don’t just take my word for it, read these Amazon reviews. The M-430 has multiple point settings but Hunter and I focused on the longest because that’s what we’re after.

My El Casco exhibited three issues that have me wondering whether or not to release it back into eBay:

1. The bare wood between the paint and graphite of a sharpened pencil is left darkened from graphite dust. A suggestion from an Erasable Facebook community member was to try cleaning the burrs with contact spray, because it may be that waxy pencils used previously were holding then releasing graphite onto my pencils. Couldn’t hurt to try it. But trying it didn’t help. I’ve seen quite a few photos of freshly sharpened-by El Casco pencils and many seem exhibit this side effect. I’ve also found online comments by people who have decided to live with these results because in their view the quality of the point makes up for the dinginess.
2. The clutch that holds the pencil straight, although it doesn’t have jagged teeth like the Angry Devil, usually leaves dents on my pencils. There is no mechanism that pulls the pencils into the burrs for you; with the El Casco you have to manually push the pencil in through the clutch. That activity, with my sharpener and at least one other M-430 out there, results in dents. Although the parts didn’t seem stiff, I disassembled this portion of the sharpener and lubed everything with silicone spray. It didn’t help. This seems to be an exceptionally sporadic occurrence among owners as I have only run across one other mention of this problem.
3. Because you must push the pencil in with one hand while turning the crank with the other, unless you’re an octopus you’ll need assistance holding the sharpener in place. The El Casco has a suction cup bottom that works well on a glass or glass-like surface but not as dependably on others. Comments among owners reveal the occasional need to replace the suction cup . . . and that actually getting a replacement may involve buying another El Casco. Several owners have stated the Spanish company, without fail, fails to respond to requests for assistance and the United States distributor has sadly chosen to follow in the customer service lead of El Casco. One Erasable member learned a new USA distributor will be taking over so maybe there’s hope that in the future, the Rolls Royce of pencil sharpeners will have something in place to help its customers.

Need Spare Parts? “No Parts for You!”
Need Spare Parts? “No Parts for You!”

Here are the results produced by the El Casco M-430:

Spectacular Points
Spectacular Points
The Five El Casco-Sharpened Pencils in the Middle Need a Bath.
The Five El Casco-Sharpened Pencils in the Middle Need a Bath.
Nice Points, Grungy Wood and Dented Pencils
Nice Points, Grungy Wood and Dented Pencils
Stephen Doesn’t Like Dents.
Stephen Doesn’t Like Dents.
And Stephen Hates Long Dents in His Blackwing 602s.
And Stephen Hates Long Dents in His Blackwing 602s.

Our verdict on whether or not the El Casco M-430 produces the finest point available: Confirmed.

But is it worth its exorbitant price? Busted.

We haven’t seen anything else that creates such a spectacular point. The dinginess of the wood seems to be a common occurrence and the indentations, which are different than the bite marks of the Angry Devil, seem to be a byproduct of a small minority of El Cascos. If you don’t care about grunge, you don’t mind the risk of dented pencils and you have a bunch of spare change lying around, this is the sharpener for you, friend. Otherwise, purchasing an El Casco and getting the results that leave you feeling like you received your money’s worth may require a lucky roll of the dice.

***

Blooper Reel

Stephen’s Rabid Greyhound: 1 part vodka to 3 parts quality pink grapefruit juice, served on ice.

Pro Tip: Save the Rabid Greyhounds for After the Review.
Pro Tip: Save the Rabid Greyhounds for After the Review.

One Reply to “All Hat No Cattle?”

  1. I have a favor to ask. Could anyone please get a fairly accurate measurement of the diameter of the tip? I am looking to match the width of victorian propelling writing pencils, which were 1.1-1.2mm in diameter. Thanks! Desk Store (http://www.deskstore.com) has their sale again (still?) and it’s aprox. $200 US if I’ve done my math correctly.

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