A Graphite Interview with Caroline Weaver, of C.W. Pencil Enterprise.

Around when we were lucky enough to have Caroline Weaver on Erasable, I begged asked Caroline if she’d be game for a paper interview: one wherein I’d write questions down and mail them to New York, and then she’d answer them in pencil and send these answers back to Baltimore. I am happy to present what I believe is the first Graphite Interview in the Stationery Blogosphere.*

*Please do correct me if I am mistaken.

CWPE_interview_1

CWPE_interview_2

CWPE_interview_3

CWPE_interview_4

CWPE_interview_5

Many thanks to Caroline! Stay tuned for two more CWPE-related posts, including The Field Guide to Visiting C.W. Pencil Enterprise and a post about my…ahem….three visits there from Baltimore this spring.

Questions and Answers.

I hope this post isn’t overly vain, but your Faithful and Fearless Editor was featured recently on Pen Addict and also on the newer Write Analog. Thanks to Mark and to Brad for great experiences!

(More PRESS.)

Two Great New Blogs.

I am coming off of a Pencil Drought, during which I “won” NaNoWriMo using only gel pens for speed. As I mentioned on the podcast, my brain doesn’t relax around pencils, no matter how much I prefer them. True to form, I got sick literally two hours before the month was over, but my words were in, and all was well. With NyQuil, that is. I am happy to have found new blogs, as I come back down to the world of graphite and writing at a normal speed.

In no particular order, here are two great new additions to The Stationery Blogosphere.

cropped-IMG_6393

Pencilism, by Luke Sinclair, author of the great hand-sharpening guide featured here. There is some great writing already on Luke’s blog, including a great post that is a moving piece on the meaning of pencils.

wa_manifesto

Write Analog, by Mark Tucker, who has been a social media friend of we Erasable hosts for some time. Check out Mark’s MANIFESTO, which I might print and hang in my house.

The Roost: A Blog at Thoreau Farm.

roostcolor1
For some reason, I had no idea that this blog existed until tonight, when I renewed my Thoreau Society membership dues (which were late): The Roost. Check out the post about sleeping on hot and humid nights here. Coming off of our first official heat wave of the summer, I feel like some very un-Thoreauvian planet-killer; we have central air conditioning that I am not shy about using on nights like this, though I suspect central Maryland was far hotter and stickier than Massachusetts was.*

With Mr. Thoreau’s birthday coming up and my trip to Massachusetts coming up next month, Henry is on my mind a lot lately. What would he think of a pencil blog? Would he just be happy people do things without computers? Would he be appalled that I prefer a wedge sharpener to a manual knife?

Would Henry listen to our podcast?

*At least the few years I lived there were not as terrible as a Maryland summer.

Review of Monteverde One Touch Stylus Tool Mechanical Pencil.

stylusontip
Ron from Pen Chalet contacted we Erasable guys about picking a cool mechanical pencil to review. I think we all picked the same pencil, in the same color: the Monteverde One Touch Stylus Tool Mechanical Pencil. My only previous review of a mechanical pencil was the blue knock-free pencil that I enjoyed. I find that I prefer mechanical pencils (and pens) that echo the shape of a hexagonal wooden pencil. So this heavy yellow pencil was a natural choice. Bear with me if my terms are terrible or if my understanding of mechanical pencils is less than basic.
wholepencil
This pencil is heavy, metal and features various measuring standards along the yellow lacquered barrel. The point is exposed by twisting the gnarled metal at the business end. The lead is 9mm. There is a stylus on the end where you’d expect to find an eraser, and there are screwdrivers hidden underneath of it.
drivers
I’m going to start with the non-pencil attributes of this pencil. First, the screwdrivers. This might be a bit…confessional. But I really (!) like to have a small philips screwdriver with whatever pencil kit I might be carrying to the coffeeshop, while traveling, etc. Why? That little screw on manual/blade pencil sharpeners! I do not know why this is so important to me. But that little purpose justifies not finding an eraser where I thought I would. The bit is two-sided, with a flathead screwdriver on the flipside. This is useful for prying staples and stuck pencil box lids.
stylusoff
The stylus works very well. It’s soft and really flows with the design of the pencil. I’ve seen many such styli that put me in mind of a giant Santa Claus in a stickpen. This is a sort of Stealth Stylus, and it works very well on my Android-powered phone. A Comrade visiting HQ when the package arrived marvelled at this feature as much as the impressive heft of the entire instrument.
stylusonback
What I like best about the stylus is that one is not stuck using it with the pencil held upsidedown, with the clip in your way. I stared at the threading around the point of the pencil for a while before I figured out that the stylus screws onto there. Then you are in business to comfortably play touchscreen games to your rubber-tipped content. You an also attach in there while using the screwdriver to replace your aging KUM brass wedge so as not to misplace it.
extrastylpic
Speaking of the point, it comes off. I admit that I only found this out after looking at a website which explained how to access the green eraser. This is a simple friction fit.
pointoff
The eraser works well in removing graphite from paper. But its flexibility and its concealment would have me reaching for an External Eraser, truth be told. Removing the eraser reveals the extra leads also.
innards
Now, the point. I really like the feed mechanism, which merely involves turning the gnarled portion of the point until the amount of lead you prefer is exposed. Gone is the guesswork involved in the click mechanism:

Three clicks are too many;
Two are too few.
I don’t want my point to break;
What’s a guy to do?

The leads are 9mm, which are pretty thick. I prefer 7mm and 9mm to thinner leads for several reasons, not the least of which is that using a lead that thick often involves The Turn (turning the point for a better/sharper surface), as I am accustomed to having to perform in using wooden pencils. The provided leads are soft and smooth, running at least near a B or even a 2B. In testing this pencil out, I joyfully ran off several sheets worth of Morning Pages, and I enjoyed the feel of this lead very much. While I still have a particular fondness for cheap Bic mechanical pencils, the leads in this tool might make a mechanical pencil snob* out of me yet. There is some odd play which acts as a sort of cushion for the lead that took a while to get used to. But I probably wore down half of the first lead trying this out, and I never broke a point. So whatever that cushioning is, it works.
point
This pencil is certainly heavy — perhaps doubly so if you are used to the weight of a wooden pencil. However, even with an old hand injury** acting up, I did not find using this pencil to be uncomfortable at all. In fact, the hexagonal shape and wide barrel were a natural fit in my ailing right hand. I was skeptical with myself regarding whether I could intelligently review such a fine pencil, or whether I could even appreciate it. But this is certainly the most fun I’ve had reviewing a mechanical pencil, and it has become a Jewel of my toolbox. In fact, not owning a “real” Blackwing myself, this is the most valuable pencil I own. Still, it is currently on sale for a mere $32.00. If you want an exquisite tool that solves several problems related to writing, this is a must-have.

I hope this review does justice to Ron’s generosity and to the really cool design of this pencil. Check out Andy’s review for better pictures (and a GIF!) and some seriously detailed Reviewsmanship. Many thanks to Ron, especially for his patience with a pencil that got lost in the mail.

* Certainly, I use that term here purely in jest.
** From cycling. You should see what my gloves looked like!

Erasable #5: Dazed and Reused.

We present the Earth Day episode, which I hope makes up for some of the sparse posting here lately. It was a wacky month, with flooding to close it in Baltimore.

Erasable Podcast 3: Indepen(cil)dance Day.

johnny_picks_550
Our special National Pencil Day episode is up for your Enjoyment and Consideration. Congrats again to our winners!

Boyhood Pencil Games.

Hogyun Lee has recently written one of the most detailed descriptions of Pencil Fighting I have ever read.

“This involved a set of tightly regulated rules whereupon a boy would challenge another to a ‘“pencil duel.’ After some preliminary positioning, two boys would take turns thumping with a single swing using only the wrist and fingers the other’s pencil held firmly and horizontally squeezed inwards firmly by the thumpee being dealt the blow. It was a destructive game, as the two took turns until one or both of the pencils developed cracks to the point of shattering apart to uselessness. The defeated was relegated to sharpening up a salvaged half of his pencil if fortunate enough to have a useable remnant.”

Read on, but don’t go breaking up your Best Pencils in fights that are for less than All the Glory, Comrades. We aren’t so young anymore, with an entire lifetime of pencils ahead of us.

Sharpies?

IMG_2650
Sometimes we get pens to review that are too awesome to ignore.* And I have this here little Side Blog for those times. Check out some really cool Sharpie gear, and ask yourself if [Hu]Man can live on Graphite alone.

*Add that to my long list of titles for something: Too Awesome to Ignore.

More Benefits of the Pocket Notebook.

VLUU L310 W  / Samsung L310 W
(A spring 2011 pocket notebook that served me well when I left working at the university for being a full-time SAHD.)
Via Paperblanks’ blog.