Plumbago, Volume II.

If you don’t listen to the Erasable Podcast and are not a member of our ever-growing Facebook group, maybe you missed the first issue of Plumbago, the zine edited by Comrade Andy Welfle. You’re in luck. Issue II is about to drop:

At long last, Plumbago is back! At 36 pages long, this zine will be chock-full of writing and illustration. We’re celebrating the spirit of the hackwing; what we call a pencil modded from its original design to suit the user’s style and usage preferences. You’re buying a pre-order to help fund the printing and distribution of this zine.

Just a few features you’ll find here:

– “What I’ve Learned from Field Notes”: A piece by urban sketcher Tina Koyama
– “Rabbinic Musings in Graphite”: about how pencils aid in the intense study environs of rabbi school by Mordechai Lightstone
– “How to Keep Score at a Baseball Game Using a Pencil”: A piece by Gregory Dresser
– “Are You *Too* Obsessed with Stationery:” A quiz to help you measure your sickness
– A comic by the Mad Penciler
– An editorial by Dr. J. Frank, encouraging you to lovingly destroy your pencils
– And lots, lots more.

Pre-order the upcoming second issue, and you will get a PDF of the first issue and maybe another little surprise too. Hurry, and click here to get  your copy, while they last!

KUM Masterpiece Instructions.

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While the KUM Masterpiece is a fine piece of engineering and one of the pieces of Pencil Ephemera about which I have been the most excited lately, there is something missing that I hope we can add to the Pencil World. The instructions on KUM’s website are not great. The video is produced to a quality standard that does no justice to all of the research and work that went into this sharpener. I have practiced a bit, and I think I have figured out the best way to use this sharpener.

First, start with a quality pencil. This machine begs for at least a good Semi-Cheap, if not something premium. From there, follow these steps:

1) Use the hole marked 1 to sharpen away the wood. Do this until the graphite hits the auto-stop (the blue piece). You might notice that there is a piece of wood stuck to the long piece of exposed graphite on one side. What you want to do is push the pencil into the hole and gently against the blade again, and keep doing this until you encounter no resistance at all, i.e., there is no more wood being cut.

1A) Another option is to push the blue plastic out of the way before step 1. Then you can expose graphite to your Pencil Heart’s content. You can then proceed on to the shaping the graphite.

2) Use the hole marked 2 to sharpen the graphite. At the beginning, the exposed wood of the pencil will not fit against the cavity of the hole. You’ll have to do your best to center the burgeoning point. Turn the pencil, and watch fine pieces of graphite pile up on top of the sharpener. Here, you have a couple of options:

2A) Bring the graphite to a nice point, and then stop. You will have an odd-looking point that is not as sharp as the Masterpiece is capable of producing. But maybe you don’t want one that’s that sharp. Or maybe you are pressed for time. The advantage of this method is that you can sharpen the graphite again to a point without having the sharpen the wood again. You can skip Step 1 and just point the graphite at least one more time.

2B) Push the point into the second hole until you notice the blade cutting wood as well as graphite. It is this method which will get you the acute point that you see on the pencils at the top of this post, and this is the Insane Point for which this sharpener is made, I believe.

I hope this is helpful and not overly cheeky to KUM. If Comrades find better/alternate ways of using this sharpener, I’m sure we’d all be glad to read about them in the comments section. Also, check out Gunther‘s and Matthias‘s posts about the Masterpiece, with way better photos and more information about this fascinating sharpener.

It Started Ten Years Ago Today.

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I was reading this book and bought these pencils. And my love of our Graphite Warrior was born.

Check out the old review of these pencils, and if you haven’t read A Moveable Feast, move yourself to get a copy somehow and read it.

Next week, Pencil Revolution turns nine years old.

I Think I Should Carry Mr. Rees’ Torch.

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Mr. David Rees, our favorite Artisanal Pencil Sharpener has hinted that he might hang up his Sharpener Hat:

When Rees started, he hoped every busted tip would lead the writer to pay for a sharpening. Instead, most customers order David’s pencil points and display them as artwork.
“The whole point of the business is to remind people to appreciate yellow, No. 2 pencils because they’re really cool and interesting,” he said. “And to make a ton of money.”
But at this point, work feels like work.
“You do anything long enough for money, it just starts to become a job,” he said.
So as he nears the nice round number of 2,000 sharpenings, Rees suggested that soon he’d like to clean out his sharpeners for good, leaving the world a much duller place.

(More…)

I am not going to kid myself and assume that I could do quite as sharp of a job as Mr. Rees does, but I think I could come close with enough practice. Of course I have one of his specially-sharpened pencils (which I should write a post about one of these days). It is a point to which one might rightly aspire! I think I could do it, while still accomplishing everything I manage to Get Done in a day. One more cup/pint of coffee a day could enable me to Transcend the normal amount of hours in a day and become an Artisanal Pencil Sharpener. As it is, I generally flutter above my chair.

(Check out our review of Mr. Rees’ fantastic book.)

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And, General’s, if you are reading this, you should totally send this apron to HQ! We LOVE (LOVE LOVE LOVE!) General’s Pencil Company at Pencil Revolution. I don’t think I know anyone who hasn’t received some of your fine pencils from me at some point. I am not being ironic or snarky or sarcastic when I say that everyone in my hipster neighborhood will see my smiling face in this apron.

Finally, check out this video of the neighborhood in which Comrades can find Pencil Revolution HQ. Indeed, most of these locations are within a two-minute walk, and my personal favorite restaurant is featured (Golden West Cafe’).

Hemingway Scrapbooks Made Public!

EHC385tApologies that this took so long to get out (and many Comrades probably already know about it, but just in case…). But, as Brian tells us, Hemingway’s family scrapbooks are not just available to the public. They are digitized and available to view for free online via the JFK Library, home to the Hemingway Collection! Check out the scrapbooks, where it looks like many passages are written in pencil. (And look at how that ink has faded!)

[Image credit.]

New Largest US Library.

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This is pretty cool and seems to warrant a trip to the Lone Star State, where I haven’t been in 11 years.

“There are thousands of abandoned big box stores sitting empty all over America, including hundreds of former Walmart stores. With each store taking up enough space for 2.5 football fields, Walmart’s use of more than 698 million square feet of land in the U.S. is one of its biggest environmental impacts. But at least one of those buildings has been transformed into something arguably much more useful: the nation’s largest library.”

Read more!

“Keep a Notebook”: Jack London.

7-7-10_jack3I’m not sure how popular Jack London is these days, but I’ve long been a fan. I read a piece today quoting Mr. London on success, and I thought I’d quote from this quotation.

“Keep a notebook. Travel with it, eat with it, sleep with it. Slap into it every stray thought that flutters up into your brain. Cheap paper is less perishable than gray matter, and lead pencil markings endure longer than memory.”

JackLondon-office-1916This is also the source of the differently-quoted line about inspiration:

“Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will none the less get something that looks remarkably like it.”

Jack London, “Getting into Print,” 1903, via The Art of Manliness.

E. A. Poe at the Pratt and Baltimore.

In another possibly Shameless Plug for my hometown and the location of Pencil Revolution HQ, I have to mention the excellent Poe Collection at the Pratt in Baltimore. The collection includes letters, art, and artifacts. Baltimore itself is a bastion Poe-dom. We have Poe’s body, interred at Westminister Hall and Burying Ground. As such, the Poe Toaster also visited our fair city annually. The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum is in Baltimore, not far from Poe’s final resting place. Of course, we also have the most literary-ily named NFL team: The Baltimore Ravens.

For more…information (or, a fictional view which presents some new historical facts) about Mr. Poe’s death, Comrades are urged to read Matthew Pearl’s The Poe Shadow, which depicts mid-19th century Baltimore in a unique light, especially for natives of Charm City.

Finally, the recent film, The Raven, which was widely panned by critics, is actually a fun film, even if not filmed in Baltimore. If nothing else, James McTeigue‘s direction (as in V for Vendetta) was excellent.

Thoreau’s Pencils, Notetaking and Harvard.


Interesting news from a location about which I’ve been thinking a great deal lately, especially at this time of year, via Orange Crate Art and Notebook Stories.

Harvard University is hosting an exploration of note-taking called TAKE NOTE. Comrades can view the exhibits online, if you are too far from Cambridge to see them in person. One of the exhibits features the Brazil notebook of one of my very favorite philosophers, William James, and Thoreau’s pencils are also on display. This exhibit and conference are among the myriad reasons I wish I could visit my home (Massachusetts) of two years this autumn.